Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

  • Erectile Dysfunction is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis during sexual performance.

  • Stem Cell Treatmentst aims to effect the Calcium-sensitive potassium channel and therefore help increase the flow of blood into the Corpus.

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTIONA penile erection is the hydraulic effect of blood entering and being retained in sponge-like bodies within the penis. The process is often initiated as a result of sexual arousal, when signals are transmitted from the brain to nerves in the penis. Erectile dysfunction is indicated when an erection is difficult to produce. There are various circulatory causes, including alteration of the voltage-gated potassium channel, as in arsenic poisoning from drinking water.

The most important organic causes are cardiovascular disease and diabetes, neurological problems (for example, trauma from prostatectomy surgery), hormonal insufficiencies (hypogonadism) and drug side effects.

Psychological impotence is where erection or penetration fails due to thoughts or feelings (psychological reasons) rather than physical impossibility; this is somewhat less frequent but often can be helped. Notably in psychological impotence, there is a strong response to placebo treatment. Erectile dysfunction, tied closely as it is about ideas of physical well being, can have severe psychological consequences.

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

NIH Streaming Database:

Safety and tolerability of intradiscal implantation of combined autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and hyaluronic acid in patients with chronic discogenic low back pain: 1-year follow-up of a phase I study. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2017 Nov 15;8(1):262 Authors: Kumar H, Ha DH, Lee EJ, Park JH, Shim JH, Ahn TK, Kim KT, Ropper AE, Sohn S, Kim CH, Thakor DK, Lee SH, Han IB Abstract BACKGROUND: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) offer potential as a therapeutic option for chronic discogenic low back pain (LBP) because of their immunomodulatory functions and capacity for cartilage differentiation. The goal of this study was to assess the safety and tolerability of a single intradiscal implantation of combined AT-MSCs and hyaluronic acid (HA) derivative in patients with chronic discogenic LBP. METHODS: We performed a single-arm phase I clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up and enrolled 10 eligible chronic LBP patients. Chronic LBP had lasted for more than 3 months with a minimum intensity of 4/10 on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and disability level ≥ 30% on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The 10 patients underwent a single intradiscal injection of combined HA derivative and AT-MSCs at a dose of 2 × 10(7) cells/disc (n = 5) or 4 × 10(7) cells/disc (n = 5). Safety and treatment outcomes were evaluated by assessing VAS, ODI, Short Form-36 (SF-36), and imaging (lumbar spine X-ray imaging and MRI) at regular intervals over 1 year. RESULTS: No patients were lost at any point during the 1-year clinical study. We observed no procedure or stem cell-related adverse events or serious adverse events during the 1-year follow-up period. VAS, ODI, and SF-36 scores significantly improved in both groups receiving both low (cases 2, 4, and 5) and high (cases 7, 8, and 9) cell doses, and did not differ significantly between the two groups. Among six patients who achieved significant improvement in VAS, ODI, and SF-36, three patients (cases 4, 8, and 9) were determined to have increased water content based on an increased apparent diffusion coefficient on diffusion MRI. CONCLUSIONS: Combined implantation of AT-MSCs and HA derivative in chronic discogenic LBP is safe and tolerable. However, the efficacy of combined AT-MSCs and HA should be investigated in a randomized controlled trial in a larger population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02338271 . Registered 7 January 2015. PMID: 29141662 [PubMed - in process]
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