Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

  • Erectile Dysfunction is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis during sexual performance.

  • Stem Cell Treatmentst aims to effect the Calcium-sensitive potassium channel and therefore help increase the flow of blood into the Corpus.

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTIONA penile erection is the hydraulic effect of blood entering and being retained in sponge-like bodies within the penis. The process is often initiated as a result of sexual arousal, when signals are transmitted from the brain to nerves in the penis. Erectile dysfunction is indicated when an erection is difficult to produce. There are various circulatory causes, including alteration of the voltage-gated potassium channel, as in arsenic poisoning from drinking water.

The most important organic causes are cardiovascular disease and diabetes, neurological problems (for example, trauma from prostatectomy surgery), hormonal insufficiencies (hypogonadism) and drug side effects.

Psychological impotence is where erection or penetration fails due to thoughts or feelings (psychological reasons) rather than physical impossibility; this is somewhat less frequent but often can be helped. Notably in psychological impotence, there is a strong response to placebo treatment. Erectile dysfunction, tied closely as it is about ideas of physical well being, can have severe psychological consequences.

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

NIH Streaming Database:

Development of a KLD-12 polypeptide/TGF-β1-tissue scaffold promoting the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell into nucleus pulposus-like cells for treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. Int J Clin Exp Pathol. 2015;8(2):1093-103 Authors: Bian Z, Sun J Abstract OBJECTIVE: To develop tissue engineering scaffolds consisting of self-assembling KLD-12 polypeptide/TGF-β1 nanofiber gel, for the induction of mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) differentiation into nucleus pulposus (NP)-like cells. METHODS: The release of TGF-β1 from KLD-12 polypeptide gels containing varying TGF-β1 concentrations was detected by ELISA. MSCs were isolated with a density gradient method and their differentiation into NP-like cells was analyzed in KLD-12 polypeptide/TGF-β1- or KLD-12 polypeptide control nanofiber-gel 3D-cultures. The Alcianblue method, Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), and immunocytochemistry were used to measure the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, such as aggrecan, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and type II collagen. RESULTS: ELISA results documented favorable time-dependent release characteristics of TGF-β1 in the KLD-12 polypeptide/TGF-β1 gel scaffolds. The results of CCK-8 cell proliferation assay showed the TGF-β1 containing scaffolds induced higher growth rate in MSCs compared to the control group. Calcein-AM/PI fluorescent staining showed: the cells in the gel grew well, maintaining the circular shape of cells, and the spindle and fusiform shape of cells on the gel edges. The cell viability displayed a survival rate of 89.14% ± 2.468 for the TGF-β1 group with no significant difference between the two groups at 14 d of culture. The production of ECM was monitored showing higher expression of GAGs in the TGF-β1 group (P < 0.01) with highest amounts at 10 d and 14 d compared to 4 d and 7 d (P < 0.05). Real-time PCR results revealed that the expression levels of collagen II and aggrecan mRNA were higher in the TGF-β1 group (P < 0.05). Finally, immunocytochemical staining of collagen II confirmed the higher expression levels. CONCLUSION: A scaffold containing a KLD-12 polypeptide/TGF-β1-nanofiber gel and MSCs differentiated into NP-like cells is able to produce ECM and has the potential to serve as a three-dimensional (3-D) support scaffold for the filling of early postoperative residual cavities and the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID: 25972996 [PubMed - in process]
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