Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

  • Erectile Dysfunction is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis during sexual performance.

  • Stem Cell Treatmentst aims to effect the Calcium-sensitive potassium channel and therefore help increase the flow of blood into the Corpus.

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTIONA penile erection is the hydraulic effect of blood entering and being retained in sponge-like bodies within the penis. The process is often initiated as a result of sexual arousal, when signals are transmitted from the brain to nerves in the penis. Erectile dysfunction is indicated when an erection is difficult to produce. There are various circulatory causes, including alteration of the voltage-gated potassium channel, as in arsenic poisoning from drinking water.

The most important organic causes are cardiovascular disease and diabetes, neurological problems (for example, trauma from prostatectomy surgery), hormonal insufficiencies (hypogonadism) and drug side effects.

Psychological impotence is where erection or penetration fails due to thoughts or feelings (psychological reasons) rather than physical impossibility; this is somewhat less frequent but often can be helped. Notably in psychological impotence, there is a strong response to placebo treatment. Erectile dysfunction, tied closely as it is about ideas of physical well being, can have severe psychological consequences.

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

NIH Streaming Database:

In vivo tracking on longer retention of transplanted myocardin gene-modified adipose-derived stem cells to improve erectile dysfunction in diabetic rats. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2019 Jul 16;10(1):208 Authors: Zhang HB, Chen FZ, He SH, Liang YB, Wang ZQ, Wang L, Chen ZR, Ding W, Zhao SC, Wei AY Abstract BACKGROUND: Stem cell therapy has revealed a promising future for treating erectile dysfunction (ED), but the fate and curative mechanism of intracavernosal transplanted stem cells are under further exploration. This study aimed to demonstrate the effects of myocardin gene modification on improving erectile function and prolonging the retention of implanted adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) using in vivo small animal imaging. METHODS: ASCs were isolated, cultured, and identified by flow cytometry and osteogenic and adipogenic induction. The effects of gene modification on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and contraction were determined by CCK-8, EdU, flow cytometry, and collagen gel lattice contraction assays as well as confocal microscopy. A total of 20 normal and 60 diabetes mellitus ED to (DMED) Sprague-Dawley rats were recruited to the 7 day and 21 day groups. Each group contained subgroups of 10 rats each: the negative control (NC), DMED + ASCs plus Ad-Luc-Myocardin, DMED + ASCs plus Ad-Luc, and DMED + phosphate buffer solution (PBS) groups. Erectile function was evaluated with the intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure (△ICP/MAP) ratio. In vivo small animal imaging and an EdU cell tracking strategy were introduced to detect the transplanted ASCs, and IHC and WB were performed to assess smooth muscle cell protein levels. RESULTS: The ASCs expressed high CD29 and CD90 and scant CD45, while the multi-induction potential was verified by oil red O and alizarin red staining. Gene transfection of myocardin had no significant influence on ASC apoptosis but inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell contraction. Myocardin combined with ASCs enhanced the therapeutic potential of ASCs for improving the △ICP/MAP ratio as well as α-SMA and calponin expression. In vivo imaging confirmed that ASCs resided within the cavernous body in 21 days, while only a few red EdU dots were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Myocardin induced ASC differentiation towards smooth muscle-like cells and enhanced the therapeutic potential of ASCs for ameliorating ED in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Notably, in vivo small animal tracking was an effective strategy for monitoring the implanted stem cells, and this strategy might have advantages over traditional EdU assays. PMID: 31311594 [PubMed - in process]
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