Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

  • Erectile Dysfunction is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis during sexual performance.

  • Stem Cell Treatmentst aims to effect the Calcium-sensitive potassium channel and therefore help increase the flow of blood into the Corpus.

STEM CELL TREATMENT ERECTILE DYSFUNCTIONA penile erection is the hydraulic effect of blood entering and being retained in sponge-like bodies within the penis. The process is often initiated as a result of sexual arousal, when signals are transmitted from the brain to nerves in the penis. Erectile dysfunction is indicated when an erection is difficult to produce. There are various circulatory causes, including alteration of the voltage-gated potassium channel, as in arsenic poisoning from drinking water.

The most important organic causes are cardiovascular disease and diabetes, neurological problems (for example, trauma from prostatectomy surgery), hormonal insufficiencies (hypogonadism) and drug side effects.

Psychological impotence is where erection or penetration fails due to thoughts or feelings (psychological reasons) rather than physical impossibility; this is somewhat less frequent but often can be helped. Notably in psychological impotence, there is a strong response to placebo treatment. Erectile dysfunction, tied closely as it is about ideas of physical well being, can have severe psychological consequences.

Stem Cell Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction

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Related Articles The effects of human Wharton's jelly cell transplantation on the intervertebral disc in a canine disc degeneration model. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2015;6(1):154 Authors: Zhang Y, Tao H, Gu T, Zhou M, Jia Z, Jiang G, Chen C, Han Z, Xu C, Wang D, He Q, Ruan D Abstract INTRODUCTION: Cell-based therapy was a promising treatment method for disc degenerative diseases. Wharton's jelly cell (WJC) has been explored to cure various human diseases, while it still remains unknown about this MSC for disc repair. In our prior work, WJCs could differentiate into nucleus pulposus (NP)-like cells by co-culturing with NP cells in vitro. Thence, the aim of this study was further to investigate the survival and function of WJCs in vivo after transplantation into degenerated canine discs. METHOD: WJCs were isolated from human umbilical cords and labeled with EGFP. The degeneration of L4-5, L5-6, and L6-7 discs of beagles was induced by aspirating the NP tissues. Four weeks after the operation, the injured discs were left to be no treatment at L4-5 (DS group), injected with 0.9 % saline at L5-6 (FS group), and transplanted with EGFP-labeled WJCs at L6-7 (TS group). In all animals, the intact disc L3-4 served as a control (CS group). The animals were followed up for 24 weeks after initial operation. Spine imaging was evaluated at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. Histologic, biomechanics and gene expression analyses were performed at 24 weeks. Immunohistochemistry for aggrecan, types II collagen, SOX-9 was employed to investigate the matrix formation in the NP. RESULTS: The TS group showed a significantly smaller reduction in the disc height and T2-weighted signal intensity, and a better spinal segmental stability than DS and FS groups. Histologic assay demonstrated that WJCs were specifically detected in TS group at 24 weeks and the discs of TS group maintained a relatively well preserved structure as compared to the discs of DS and FS groups. Furthermore, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that expressions of disc matrix genes, aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX-9, were up-regulated in TS group compared to DS and FS groups. CONCLUSION: WJCs could not only survive in the degenerate IVDs, but also promote the disc matrix formation of aggrecan and type II collagen in the degenerate IVDs. It may have value in cell-based therapy for degenerative disc disease. PMID: 26311326 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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