Stem Cell Treatment for Autism

Stem Cell Treatments for Autism are currently available at SIRM

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism Stem Cell Treatment  Autism

Autism Background:

About a third to a half of individuals with autism do not develop enough natural speech to meet their daily communication needs. Differences in communication may be present from the first year of life, and may include delayed onset of babbling, unusual gestures, diminished responsiveness, and vocal patterns that are not synchronized with the caregiver. In the second and third years, autistic children have less frequent and less diverse babbling, consonants, words, and word combinations; their gestures are less often integrated with words. Autistic children are less likely to make requests or share experiences, and are more likely to simply repeat others' words (echolalia) or reverse pronouns. Joint attention seems to be necessary for functional speech, and deficits in joint attention seem to distinguish infants with ASD. for example, they may look at a pointing hand instead of the pointed-at object, and they consistently fail to point at objects in order to comment on or share an experience. Autistic children may have difficulty with imaginative play and with developing symbols into language.

Repetitive behavior

Forms of repetitive or restricted behavior (RBS-R):

  • Stereotypy is repetitive movement, such as hand flapping, making sounds, head rolling, or body rocking.
  • Compulsive behavior is intended and appears to follow rules, such as arranging objects in stacks or lines.
  • Sameness is resistance to change; for example, insisting that the furniture not be moved or refusing to be interrupted.
  • Ritualistic behavior involves an unvarying pattern of daily activities, such as an unchanging menu or a dressing ritual. This is closely associated with sameness and an independent validation has suggested combining the two factors.
  • Restricted behavior is limited in focus, interest, or activity, such as preoccupation with a single television program, toy, or game.
  • Self-injury includes movements that injure or can injure the person, such as eye poking, skin picking, hand biting, and head banging. A 2007 study reported that self-injury at some point affected about 30% of children with ASD.

No single repetitive or self-injurious behavior seems to be specific to autism, but only autism appears to have an elevated pattern of occurrence and severity of these behaviors.

Autism treatment studies and stem cell protocols:

Related Articles Impaired Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitophagy in Neuronal Models of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. Cell Rep. 2016 Oct 18;17(4):1053-1070 Authors: Ebrahimi-Fakhari D, Saffari A, Wahlster L, Di Nardo A, Turner D, Lewis TL, Conrad C, Rothberg JM, Lipton JO, Kölker S, Hoffmann GF, Han MJ, Polleux F, Sahin M Abstract Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurodevelopmental disease caused by TSC1 or TSC2 mutations and subsequent activation of the mTORC1 kinase. Upon mTORC1 activation, anabolic metabolism, which requires mitochondria, is induced, yet at the same time the principal pathway for mitochondrial turnover, autophagy, is compromised. How mTORC1 activation impacts mitochondrial turnover in neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate impaired mitochondrial homeostasis in neuronal in vitro and in vivo models of TSC. We find that Tsc1/2-deficient neurons accumulate mitochondria in cell bodies, but are depleted of axonal mitochondria, including those supporting presynaptic sites. Axonal and global mitophagy of damaged mitochondria is impaired, suggesting that decreased turnover may act upstream of impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Importantly, blocking mTORC1 or inducing mTOR-independent autophagy restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Our study clarifies the complex relationship between the TSC-mTORC1 pathway, autophagy, and mitophagy, and defines mitochondrial homeostasis as a therapeutic target for TSC and related diseases. PMID: 27760312 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Related Articles Using tuberous sclerosis complex to understand the impact of MTORC1 signaling on mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy in neurons. Autophagy. 2017 Apr 03;13(4):754-756 Authors: Ebrahimi-Fakhari D, Saffari A, Wahlster L, Sahin M Abstract Constitutive activation of the MTOR pathway is a key feature of defects in the tuberous sclerosis complex and other genetic neurodevelopmental diseases, collectively referred to as MTORopathies. MTORC1 hyperactivity promotes anabolic cell functions such as protein synthesis, yet at the same time catabolic processes such as macroautophagy/autophagy are suppressed. Mitochondria are major substrates of autophagy; however, their role in MTORopathies remains largely undefined. Here, we review our recent study showing that several aspects of mitochondrial function, dynamics and turnover are critically impaired in neuronal models of TSC. We discuss the relevance of these findings to neurological manifestations associated with TSC and speculate on autophagy as a novel treatment target for MTORopathies. PMID: 28121223 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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