Macular Degeneration Stem Cell Treatment

Macular Degeneration and Stem Cell Therapy

What is Macular Degeneration?

Macular Degeneration and Stem Cell Therapy

Macular Degeneration and Stem Cell Therapy


Macular Degeneration or Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD,ARMD) is a eyesight condition which mostly affects older people. AMD results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula) because of damage or wear to the retina.

AMD can occur in either a wet or dry types. AMD is a major cause of visual impairment in people of 50 years age or more. AMD can make it difficult or impossible to read or to be able to recognize faces, although enough peripheral vision can remain to allow normal daily life.
 
Although some macular dystrophies that younger people get are referred to as macular degeneration, the term generally refers to age-related macular degeneration.

 

Stemming vision loss with stem cells.

J Clin Invest. 2010 Sep 1;120(9):3012-21

Authors: Marchetti V, Krohne TU, Friedlander DF, Friedlander M

Dramatic advances in the field of stem cell research have raised the possibility of using these cells to treat a variety of diseases. The eye is an excellent target organ for such cell-based therapeutics due to its ready accessibility, the prevalence of vasculo- and neurodegenerative diseases affecting vision, and the availability of animal models to demonstrate proof of concept. In fact, stem cell therapies have already been applied to the treatment of disease affecting the ocular surface, leading to preservation of vision. Diseases in the back of the eye, such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and inherited retinal degenerations, present greater challenges, but rapidly emerging stem cell technologies hold the promise of autologous grafts to stabilize vision loss through cellular replacement or paracrine rescue effects.

PMID: 20811157 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles The rescue effect of mesenchymal stem cell on sodium iodate-induced retinal pigment epithelial cell death through deactivation of NF-κB-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome. Biomed Pharmacother. 2018 Apr 17;103:517-523 Authors: Mao X, Pan T, Shen H, Xi H, Yuan S, Liu Q Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease resulting in the gradual loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the permanent visual damage. Various risk factors, including oxidative stress, form a complex network at the confluence of inflammation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) is a well-studied population of adult stem cell with strong neuroprotective and immunoregulatory properties. Here, we reported the protective effect of MSC on sodium iodate (NaIO3)-triggered RPE degeneration. Sodium iodate (NaIO3)-induced RPE cell death was remarkably reduced when cocultured with MSC. Inhibition of several cell death pathways mediated by mitochondrial instability and its subsequent caspase-1/3/8 activation was implicated in this process. In addition, NLRP3 inflammasome, the upstream of caspase-1 activation, was also found downregulated via suppressing its priming signal NF-κB pathway. Taken together, MSC protected against NaIO3-triggered RPE death via deactivating NF-κB-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome and maintaining mitochondrial integrity. This study highlights the significant role of MSC in modulating the proinflammatory environment of AMD, and suggests the clinical value of MSC in treating AMD as well as RPE replacement therapy. PMID: 29677537 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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