Liver Disease Stem Cell Treatment

Liver Disease and Stem Cell Therapy at SIRM

 

Liver Disease and Stem Cell Treatment

Liver Disease and Stem Cell Treatment

What is Liver Disease?
The liver is under your ribs on the right hand side. The liver is the largest organ in the body and if the liver fails completely then untreated only 3-4 days to find a donor liver for a possible transplant.

Corrently there is no such thing as an artificial liver.

The liver not only produces many proteins it creates energy from our food. The liver removes waste products in our body and also removes unwanted drugs such as nicotine and alcohol.

The most common Liver conditions include infections such as hepatitis A, B, C, E, alcohol damage, fatty liver, cirrhosis, cancer, drug damage especially paracetamol (acetaminophen) and cancer drugs.

 

The liver does not have any pain nerves so liver disease can be unexpected.
Liver disease is commonly related to alcohol and diet problems.

 


STEM CELL RESEARCH



Use of hepatocyte and stem cells for treatment of post-resectional liver failure: are we there yet?

Ezzat TM, Dhar DK, Newsome PN, Malagó M, Olde Damink SW.


2011 Jul;31(6):773-84. doi: 10.1111/j.1478-3231.2011.02530.x. Epub 2011 Apr 19.

Source
HPB and Liver Transplantation Surgery, Royal Free Hospital, University College London, Pond Street, London, UK.


Abstract
Post-operative liver failure following extensive resections for liver tumours is a rare but significant complication. The only effective treatment is liver transplantation (LT); however, there is a debate about its use given the high mortality compared with the outcomes of LT for chronic liver diseases.

Cell therapy has emerged as a possible alternative to LT especially as endogenous hepatocyte proliferation is likely inhibited in the setting of prior chemo/radiotherapy. Both hepatocyte and stem cell transplantations have shown promising results in the experimental setting; however, there are few reports on their clinical application.

This review identifies the potential stem cell sources in the body, and highlights the triggering factors that lead to their mobilization and integration in liver regeneration following major liver resections.

Therapeutic plasticity of stem cells and allograft tolerance.

Cytotherapy. 2011 May 10;

Authors: Sordi V, Piemonti L

Abstract Transplantation is the treatment of choice for many diseases that result in organ failure, but its success is limited by organ rejection. Stem cell therapy has emerged in the last years as a promising strategy for the induction of tolerance after organ transplantation. Here we discuss the ability of different stem cell types, in particular mesenchymal stromal cells, neuronal stem/progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells and embryonic stem cells, to modulate the immune response and induce peripheral or central tolerance.

These stem cells have been studied to explore tolerance induction to several transplanted organs, such as heart, liver and kidney. Different strategies, including approaches to generating tolerance in islet transplantation, are discussed here.

PMID: 21554176 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

 

Impaired function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in  murine liver fibrosis.

Biosci Trends. 2011 Apr;5(2):77-82

Authors: Shirakura K, Masuda H, Kwon SM, Obi S, Ito R, Shizuno T, Kurihara Y,  Mine T, Asahara T

Liver fibrosis (LF) caused by chronic liver damage has been considered as an  irreversible disease. As alternative therapy for liver transplantation, there  are high expectations for regenerative medicine of the liver.

Bone marrow (BM)-  or peripheral blood-derived stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells  (EPCs), have recently been used to treat liver cirrhosis. We investigated the  biology of BM-derived EPC in a mouse model of LF. C57BL/6J mice were  subcutaneously injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)  every 3 days for 90 days. Sacrificed 2 days after final injection, whole blood  (WB) was collected for isolation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) and biochemical  examination.

Assessments of EPC in the peripheral blood and BM were performed by  flow cytometry and EPC colonyforming assay, respectively, using purified MNCs  and BM c-KIT+, Sca-1+, and  Lin- (KSL) cells.

Liver tissues underwent histological  analysis with hematoxylin/eosin/Azan staining, and spleens were excised and  weighed. CCl4-treated mice exhibited histologically  bridging fibrosis, pseudolobular formation, and splenomegaly, indicating  successful induction of LF.

The frequency of definitive EPC-colony-forming-units  (CFU) as well as total EPC-CFU at the equivalent cell number of 500 BM-KSL cells  decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) in LF mice compared with control mice;  no significant changes in primitive EPC-CFU occurred in LF mice.

The frequency  of WB-MNCs of definitive EPC-CFU decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in LF  mice compared with control mice. Together, these findings indicated the  existence of impaired EPC function and differentiation in BM-derived EPCs in LF  mice and might be related to clinical LF.

PMID: 21572251 [PubMed - in process]

Related Articles Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Regulate Tumor-Initiating Cell Plasticity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma through c-Met/FRA1/HEY1 Signaling. Cell Rep. 2016 05 10;15(6):1175-89 Authors: Lau EY, Lo J, Cheng BY, Ma MK, Lee JM, Ng JK, Chai S, Lin CH, Tsang SY, Ma S, Ng IO, Lee TK Abstract Like normal stem cells, tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) are regulated extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment. Because HCC develops primarily in the context of cirrhosis, in which there is an enrichment of activated fibroblasts, we hypothesized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) would regulate liver T-ICs. We found that the presence of α-SMA(+) CAFs correlates with poor clinical outcome. CAF-derived HGF regulates liver T-ICs via activation of FRA1 in an Erk1,2-dependent manner. Further functional analysis identifies HEY1 as a direct downstream effector of FRA1. Using the STAM NASH-HCC mouse model, we find that HGF-induced FRA1 activation is associated with the fibrosis-dependent development of HCC. Thus, targeting the CAF-derived, HGF-mediated c-Met/FRA1/HEY1 cascade may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HCC. PMID: 27134167 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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