Stem Cell Treatments for Huntington's Disease

Stem Cell Treatments for Huntington's Disease are Currently Available at SIRM.

Area of the brain most damaged in early Huntington's disease – striatum (shown in purple)

Stem Cell Treatment for Huntingtons

Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative genetic disorder that affects muscle coordination and leads to cognitive decline and dementia. It typically becomes noticeable in middle age. HD is the most common genetic cause of abnormal involuntary writhing movements called chorea, and indeed the disease used to be called Huntington's chorea.

It is much more common in people of Western European descent than in those of Asian or African ancestry. The disease is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation on either of an individual's two copies of a gene called Huntingtin, which means any child of an affected parent has a 50% risk of inheriting the disease. In the rare situations where both parents have an affected copy, the risk increases to 75%, and when either parent has two affected copies, the risk is 100% (all children will be affected). Physical symptoms of Huntington's disease can begin at any age from infancy to old age, but usually begin between 35 and 44 years of age. About 6% of cases start before the age of 21 years with an akinetic-rigid syndrome; they progress faster and vary slightly.

Huntington's Disease treatment studies and stem cell protocols listed below, and at SIRM, we aim to treat Huntington's with Stem Cell Therapy

NIH Streaming Database:

Related Articles Spatial memory in Huntington's disease: a comparative review of human and animal data. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2019 Jan 15;: Authors: Glikmann-Johnston Y, Fink KD, Deng P, Torrest A, Stout JC Abstract To improve the translational predictability of treatment strategies for Huntington's disease (HD), sensitive and analogous cognitive outcomes are needed across HD animal models and humans. Spatial memory measures are promising candidates because they are based on 'visual' or 'non-verbal' cognition, and are commonly tested in both animals and humans. Here, we consider the suitability of spatial memory for strengthening translational links between animals and humans in HD research and clinical trials. We describe findings of spatial memory impairments in human HD and mouse models, including which aspects of spatial memory are most affected and at which time points in disease progression. We also describe the neural systems that underlie spatial memory and link spatial memory impairments to HD neuropathology, focussing on striatal and hippocampal systems. We provide a critical analysis of the literature in terms of the suitability of spatial memory for bridging the translational gap between species. Finally, we discuss possible neural mechanisms that might explain the spatial memory impairments seen in HD, and their relevance to potential treatments. PMID: 30658070 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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