Stroke Stem Cell Treatment

 

Stem Cell Treatment for StrokeStem Cell Treatment for a Stroke is an option

What is a Stroke?

Stroke and Stem Cell Therapy


A stroke (Cerebrovascular Accident or CVA), is the rapid loss of brain function due to the blood supply to the brain being disturbed. This can be from ischemia from the lack of blood flow or from a blockage known as Thrombosis, an Arterial Embolism, or a Haemorrhage where blood is leaking out or inside the brain.

The affected area of the brain is unable to function correctly and may result in an inability to move especially in one or more limbs on one side of the body. Stroke can also cause an inability to understand speech or speak or see properly. 

A stroke is a medical emergency that needs immediate medical attention. Stroke can cause permanent neurological damage and ongoing complications, and death. It is the a leading cause of adult disability in the around the world.

Risk factors for stroke include ederly people,  high blood pressure (hypertension), a previous stroke or from a transient ischemic attack (TIA).

Other related risk conditions include diabetes, high cholesterol, cigarette smoking and atrial fibrillation. High blood pressure is the most important modifiable risk factor of stroke.

A silent stroke is a stroke that does not have any outward symptoms, and the patient is typically unaware they have suffered a stroke. A silent stroke still causes damage to the brain, and places the person at risk for both transient ischemic attack and a major stroke occuring in the future.

People who have suffered a major stroke are at risk of having silent strokes as well.Stem Cell Treatment for Stroke

 

Stroke rehabilitation.

Lancet. 2011 May 14;377(9778):1693-702

Authors: Langhorne P, Bernhardt J, Kwakkel G

Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics.

Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice.

PMID: 21571152 [PubMed - in process]

 

Stem Cell Treatment for Stroke NIH Streaming Database:

Related Articles Top 3 Behavioral Tests in Cell Therapy Studies After Stroke: Difficult to Stop a Moving Train. Stroke. 2017 Sep 20;: Authors: Cui LL, Golubczyk D, Jolkkonen J PMID: 28931616 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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Related Articles The long-term fate of mesenchymal stem cells labeled with magnetic resonance imaging-visible polymersomes in cerebral ischemia. Int J Nanomedicine. 2017;12:6705-6719 Authors: Duan X, Lu L, Wang Y, Zhang F, Mao J, Cao M, Lin B, Zhang X, Shuai X, Shen J Abstract Understanding the long-term fate and potential mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after transplantation is essential for improving functional benefits of stem cell-based stroke treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered an attractive and clinically translatable tool for longitudinal tracking of stem cells, but certain controversies have arisen in this regard. In this study, we used SPION-loaded cationic polymersomes to label green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing MSCs to determine whether MRI can accurately reflect survival, long-term fate, and potential mechanisms of MSCs in ischemic stroke therapy. Our results showed that MSCs could improve the functional outcome and reduce the infarct volume of stroke in the brain. In vivo MRI can verify the biodistribution and migration of grafted cells when pre-labeled with SPION-loaded polymersome. The dynamic change of low signal volume on MRI can reflect the tendency of cell survival and apoptosis, but may overestimate long-term survival owing to the presence of iron-laden macrophages around cell graft. Only a small fraction of grafted cells survived up to 8 weeks after transplantation. A minority of these surviving cells were differentiated into astrocytes, but not into neurons. MSCs might exert their therapeutic effect via secreting paracrine factors rather than directing cell replacement through differentiation into neuronal and/or glial phenotypes. PMID: 28932115 [PubMed - in process]
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