Retinitis Pigmentosa Stem Cell Treatment

Stem Cell Treatmtent for Retinitis Pigmentosa

 
stem cell treatment for retinitis pigmentosa

Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa treatments using stem cells is now an option...

Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic eye conditions that leads to incurable blindness. In the progression of symptoms for Retinitis pigmentosa, night blindness generally precedes tunnel vision by years or even decades. Many people with Retinitis pigmentosa do not become legally blind until their 40s or 50s and retain some sight all their lives. Others go completely blind from Retinitis pigmentosa, in some cases as early as childhood. Progression of Retinitis pigmentosa is different in each case.

Retinitis pigmentosa is a type of progressive retinal dystrophy, a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or nyctalopia (night blindness), followed by reduction of the peripheral visual field (known as tunnel vision) and, sometimes, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease.

At ASCI - Stem Cell Institute, our goal is to get you seeing again. Let us help you!

Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

Streaming NIH database and search results:

Quality of life in patients with retinitis pigmentosa submitted to intravitreal use of bone marrow-derived stem cells (Reticell -clinical trial). Stem Cell Res Ther. 2015;6(1):29 Authors: Siqueira RC, Messias A, Messias K, Arcieri RS, Ruiz MA, Souza NF, Martins LC, Jorge R Abstract INTRODUCTION: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a severe neurodegenerative disease of the retina that can lead to blindness. Even without treatment, a clinical study with the use of stem cells is currently underway and the results are being evaluated. In the present report we assess the vision-related quality of life in patients with RP submitted to intravitreal use of bone marrow-derived stem cells. METHOD: The study included 20 patients with RP submitted to intravitreal use of bone marrow-derived stem cells. We evaluate the vision-related quality of life (VRQOL) of patients using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (NEI VFQ-25). Patients were scheduled to answer the questionnaire before treatment and 3 and 12 months after treatment. RESULTS: All patients completed the survey as scheduled. There was a statistically significant improvement (P <0.05) in the quality of life of patients 3 months after treatment, whereas by the 12th month there was no statistically significant difference from baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Cell therapy with intravitreal use of bone marrow-derived stem cells can improve the quality of life of patients with RP, although the improvement is lost with time. A larger number of cases will be necessary to evaluate the repercussions of this therapy on the quality of life of these patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01560715 . Registered March 19, 2012. PMID: 25890251 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Read more...

Quick Contact Form