Retinitis Pigmentosa Stem Cell Treatment

Stem Cell Treatmtent for Retinitis Pigmentosa

 
stem cell treatment for retinitis pigmentosa

Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa treatments using stem cells is now an option...

Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic eye conditions that leads to incurable blindness. In the progression of symptoms for Retinitis pigmentosa, night blindness generally precedes tunnel vision by years or even decades. Many people with Retinitis pigmentosa do not become legally blind until their 40s or 50s and retain some sight all their lives. Others go completely blind from Retinitis pigmentosa, in some cases as early as childhood. Progression of Retinitis pigmentosa is different in each case.

Retinitis pigmentosa is a type of progressive retinal dystrophy, a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or nyctalopia (night blindness), followed by reduction of the peripheral visual field (known as tunnel vision) and, sometimes, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease.

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Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

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Related Articles Precision Medicine: Genetic Repair of Retinitis Pigmentosa in Patient-Derived Stem Cells. Sci Rep. 2016 Jan 27;6:19969 Authors: Bassuk AG, Zheng A, Li Y, Tsang SH, Mahajan VB Abstract Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from patient fibroblasts could potentially be used as a source of autologous cells for transplantation in retinal disease. Patient-derived iPSCs, however, would still harbor disease-causing mutations. To generate healthy patient-derived cells, mutations might be repaired with new gene-editing technology based on the bacterial system of clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9, thereby yielding grafts that require no patient immunosuppression. We tested whether CRISPR/Cas9 could be used in patient-specific iPSCs to precisely repair an RPGR point mutation that causes X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Fibroblasts cultured from a skin-punch biopsy of an XLRP patient were transduced to produce iPSCs carrying the patient's c.3070G > T mutation. The iPSCs were transduced with CRISPR guide RNAs, Cas9 endonuclease, and a donor homology template. Despite the gene's repetitive and GC-rich sequences, 13% of RPGR gene copies showed mutation correction and conversion to the wild-type allele. This is the first report using CRISPR to correct a pathogenic mutation in iPSCs derived from a patient with photoreceptor degeneration. This important proof-of-concept finding supports the development of personalized iPSC-based transplantation therapies for retinal disease. PMID: 26814166 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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