Retinitis Pigmentosa Stem Cell Treatment

Stem Cell Treatmtent for Retinitis Pigmentosa

 
stem cell treatment for retinitis pigmentosa

Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa treatments using stem cells is now an option...

Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic eye conditions that leads to incurable blindness. In the progression of symptoms for Retinitis pigmentosa, night blindness generally precedes tunnel vision by years or even decades. Many people with Retinitis pigmentosa do not become legally blind until their 40s or 50s and retain some sight all their lives. Others go completely blind from Retinitis pigmentosa, in some cases as early as childhood. Progression of Retinitis pigmentosa is different in each case.

Retinitis pigmentosa is a type of progressive retinal dystrophy, a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or nyctalopia (night blindness), followed by reduction of the peripheral visual field (known as tunnel vision) and, sometimes, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease.

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Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

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Related Articles Mouse retinal progenitor cell dynamics on electrospun poly (ϵ-caprolactone). J Biomater Sci Polym Ed. 2012;23(11):1451-65 Authors: Cai S, Smith ME, Redenti SM, Wnek GE, Young MJ Abstract Age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma are among the many retinal degenerative diseases where retinal cell death leads to irreversible vision loss and blindness. Working toward a cell-replacement-based therapy for such diseases, a number of research groups have recently evaluated the feasibility of using retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) cultured and transplanted on biodegradable polymer substrates to replace damaged retinal tissue. Appropriate polymer substrate design is essential to providing a three-dimensional environment that can facilitate cell adhesion, proliferation and post-transplantation migration into the host environment. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a novel, ultra-thin electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold with microscale fiber diameters, appropriate porosity for infiltration by RPCs, and biologically compatible mechanical characteristics. We have verified that our electrospun PCL scaffold supports robust mouse RPC proliferation, adhesion, and differentiation in vitro, as well as migration into mouse retinal explants. These promising results make PCL a strong candidate for further development as a cell transplantation substrate in retinal regenerative research. PMID: 21781383 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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