Retinitis Pigmentosa Stem Cell Treatment

Stem Cell Treatmtent for Retinitis Pigmentosa

 
stem cell treatment for retinitis pigmentosa

Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa treatments using stem cells is now an option...

Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic eye conditions that leads to incurable blindness. In the progression of symptoms for Retinitis pigmentosa, night blindness generally precedes tunnel vision by years or even decades. Many people with Retinitis pigmentosa do not become legally blind until their 40s or 50s and retain some sight all their lives. Others go completely blind from Retinitis pigmentosa, in some cases as early as childhood. Progression of Retinitis pigmentosa is different in each case.

Retinitis pigmentosa is a type of progressive retinal dystrophy, a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or nyctalopia (night blindness), followed by reduction of the peripheral visual field (known as tunnel vision) and, sometimes, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease.

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Stem Cell Treatment for Retinitis Pigmentosa

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Related Articles Genetic background and light-dependent progression of photoreceptor cell degeneration in Prominin-1 knockout mice. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2015 Jan;56(1):164-76 Authors: Dellett M, Sasai N, Nishide K, Becker S, Papadaki V, Limb GA, Moore AT, Kondo T, Ohnuma S Abstract PURPOSE: Mutations in the Prominin-1 (Prom1) gene are known to cause retinitis pigmentosa and Stargardt disease, both of which are associated with progressive photoreceptor cell death. There are no effective therapies for either disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the retinal degeneration in Prom1-deficient mouse models. METHODS: We constructed Prom1 knockout mice with two distinct genetic backgrounds of C57BL/6 and C57BL/6xCBA/NSlc, and investigated the photoreceptor degeneration by means of histology and functional tests.. In addition, we examined the effect of light on the Prom1(-/-) retina by rearing the mice in the normal light/dark cycle and completely dark conditions. Finally, we investigated if the retinoic-acid derivative Fenretinide slowed the pace of retinal degeneration in these mouse models. RESULTS: The Prom1(-/-)-knockout mice with both backgrounds developed photoreceptor degeneration after eye opening, but the CB57/BL6-background mice developed photoreceptor cell degeneration much faster than the C57BL/6xCBA/NSlc mice, demonstrating genetic background dependency.. Interestingly, our histologic and functional examination showed that the photoreceptor cell degeneration of Prom1-knockout mice was light-dependent, and was almost completely inhibited when the mutant mice were kept in the dark. The Prom1-knockout retina showed strong downregulation of expression of the visual cycle components, Rdh12 and Abca4. Furthermore, administration of Fenretinide, which lowers the level of the toxic lipofuscin, slowed the degeneration of photoreceptor cells. CONCLUSIONS: These findings improve our understanding of the mechanism of cell death in Prominin-1-related disease and provide evidence that fenretinide may be worth studying in human disease. PMID: 25414197 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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