Pulmonary Fibrosis, Emphysema, COPD Stem Cell Treatment

Stem Cell Therapy Pulmonary Fibrosis

 

Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis and COPD are now available at SIRM

Pulmonary fibrosis is the formation or development of excess fibrous connective tissue (fibrosis) in the lungs. It is also described as "scarring of the lung."

Pulmonary fibrosis is suggested by a history of progressive shortness of breath (dyspnea) with exertion. Sometimes fine inspiratory crackles can be heard at the lung bases on auscultation. A chest x-ray may or may not be abnormal, but high Resolution CT will frequently demonstrate abnormalities.

Symptoms

Symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis are mainly:

  • Shortness of breath, particularly with exertion
  • Chronic dry, hacking coughing
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Chest discomfort
  • Loss of appetite and rapid weight loss

Stem Cell Therapy Pulmonary Fibrosis and COPD

Possible Causes

Pulmonary fibrosis may be a secondary effect of other diseases. Most of these are classified as interstitial lung diseases. Examples include autoimmune disorders, viral infections or other microscopic injuries to the lung. However, pulmonary fibrosis can also appear without any known cause. In this case, it is termed "idiopathic". Most idiopathic cases are diagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This is a diagnosis of exclusion of a characteristic set of histologic/pathologic features known as usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). In either case, there is a growing body of evidence which points to a genetic predisposition in a subset of patients. For example, a mutation in Surfactant protein C (SP-C) has been found to exist in some families with a history of pulmonary fibrosis.

Diseases and conditions that may cause pulmonary fibrosis as a secondary effect include:

  • Inhalation of environmental and occupational pollutants, such as in asbestosis, silicosis and exposure to certain gases. Coal miners, ship workers and sand blasters among others are at higher risk. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, most often resulting from inhaling dust contaminated with bacterial, fungal, or animal products.
  • Cigarette smoking can increase the risk or make the illness worse.
  • Some typical connective tissue diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Scleroderma. Other diseases that involve connective tissue, such as sarcoidosis and Wegener's granulomatosis.
  • Infections
  • Certain medications, e.g. amiodarone, bleomycin, busulfan, methotrexate, and nitrofurantoin
  • Radiation therapy to the chest.

Stem Cell Treatments for Pulmonary Fibrosis and COPD. Pulmonary Fibrosis and COPD and Stem Cell studies and protocols from the NIH:

Related Articles Tolerance of Organ Transplant Recipients to Physical Activity during a High-Altitude Expedition: Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro. PLoS One. 2015;10(11):e0142641 Authors: van Adrichem EJ, Siebelink MJ, Rottier BL, Dilling JM, Kuiken G, van der Schans CP, Verschuuren EA Abstract BACKGROUND: It is generally unknown to what extent organ transplant recipients can be physically challenged. During an expedition to Mount Kilimanjaro, the tolerance for strenuous physical activity and high-altitude of organ transplant recipients after various types of transplantation was compared to non-transplanted controls. METHODS: Twelve organ transplant recipients were selected to participate (2 heart-, 2 lung-, 2 kidney-, 4 liver-, 1 allogeneic stem cell- and 1 small bowel-transplantation). Controls comprised the members of the medical team and accompanying family members (n = 14). During the climb, cardiopulmonary parameters and symptoms of acute mountain sickness were recorded twice daily. Capillary blood analyses were performed three times during the climb and once following return. RESULTS: Eleven of the transplant participants and all controls began the final ascent from 4700 meters and reached over 5000 meters. Eight transplant participants (73%) and thirteen controls (93%) reached the summit (5895m). Cardiopulmonary parameters and altitude sickness scores demonstrated no differences between transplant participants and controls. Signs of hyperventilation were more pronounced in transplant participants and adaptation to high-altitude was less effective, which was related to a decreased renal function. This resulted in reduced metabolic compensation. CONCLUSION: Overall, tolerance to strenuous physical activity and feasibility of a high-altitude expedition in carefully selected organ transplant recipients is comparable to non-transplanted controls. PMID: 26606048 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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